It shouldn’t be so difficult….

I’m hearing this statement a lot this week and my guess is that you might be thinking the same thing too.

Let me start by giving you some context from my week.

Leadership

I was invited to interview for a spot an in upcoming national leadership summit and in preparation, was given sample interview questions. One of the questions: “how have you overcome challenges such as discrimination?” 

The reality is that I haven’t overcome discrimination [age and gender] in Corporate America but rather learned to survive it. The stats help tell the story. However, I was concerned about my answer because overcoming and surviving are two very different experiences. 

When I consulted my coach about it, her response was “it shouldn’t be so hard”. Being a subject of discrimination is hard, taking about it is hard and for some, listening to others talk about discrimination is hard. For many, it raises feelings of fear, blame and shame.

Some leaders are reportedly calling out the behavior. I’m not sure exactly what that entails but I do know that clarifying intentions during planning helps people think about their objectives and potential biases.

I’ve also started sharing some of my stories with colleagues. It’s helped to lower their defenses and made the issues easier to discuss. Sharing our challenges gives others perspective and helps leaders take the right corrective actions.

We can’t change what we don’t understand.

Physician Referrals

In the spring, I participated in a film for a public health event. The physician creating the film asked me about the role physicians should play in promoting health to their patients. He wanted to know whether they needed to be health and fitness gurus or what?

Physicians are highly trained professionals. Healthcare executives want physicians to be working at the top of their knowledge and skillset [aka: medical license] so that everyone gets the most from their expertise. Diet and exercise are foundational to health but they’re at the bottom in terms of knowledge and skill.

The problem is that in shifting to Value Based Care, physicians need to have a way to mitigate medical risk rather than only treat patients when they’re sick. Hence, the question.

What is the best way to engage physicians in maintaining the health of their patients?

We already have a universal measurement for healthy weight – Body Mass Index [BMI]. It’s something that is routinely calculated and/or captured in Electronic Health Records [EHRs]. A BMI outside the normal range is a clinical indication that something in the patient’s diet is off.

So what are physicians doing with the BMI result? I’ve never asked the question. So I’m wondering if physicians are offering patients a referral to a Dietitian and if not, why not? Dietitians are the experts in nutrition.

To solve some of the chronic health issues, we need to think about why it’s so difficult now and what needs to change to make the process easier for physicians, clinicians and patients. More specifically:

  1. Who is currently doing the work vs. who should be doing the work [considering knowledge and skills]?
  2. Is there a problem with the referral process and if so, how can we make it easier and/or better?
  3. When should digital health solutions be introduced into the discussion with patients?
  4. Who should be choosing the digital health solutions recommended to patients?
  5. Do physicians/clinicians need to monitor the patient’s progress or is the standard data collected at time of service enough? Think about what’s novel vs. necessary.

US Veterans Service

David Shulkin MD, Former Secretary of the US Veterans Affairs, wrote a new book called It Shouldn’t be this Hard to Serve your Country.

In a recent interview, he mentioned that there are back channels working in the Trump Administration to privatize the VA health system. Reportedly, his work didn’t support that effort which is why he is out.

Verily just announced their VA project to help lower the cost and improve the outcomes for total joints.