Lean

Engineering vs. Design

What’s the difference? 

Both engineering and design start with a problem but the approach to solving the problem is different. 

Engineering is about distilling data and allowing the data to dictate the solution. The problem with an engineering only approach is that there is usually more than one way to solve the problem. Hence the need for design and design thinking.

Design thinking uses brainstorming to surface all the different ideas, rapid prototyping to test the more viable ideas and iteration to apply the lessons from the prototypes.

Design often gets stifled in the healthcare industry. From my experience there are two reasons:

1/ The situation has become dire and something needs to be done quickly.

2/ The executive team is committed to one management philosophy that leaves little room for creativity.

Getting painted into a corner is never good place to start. So how do you get out of it?

Data

Everyone needs quality data to make sounds decisions whether in a clinical or business role. When the data is bad, we end up wasting resources solving problems that don’t exist and overlooking the real issues.

Did you know that only 30% of the analytic results in healthcare organizations are accurate? 

It was one of the stats that I learned from Health Catalyst recently and based on my own experience seems about right.

Part of the issue is the old adage “Garbage In/Garbage Out” and the other part is a lack of consistency in defining and extracting the data elements. 

Good design makes data capture as painless as possible and helps to standardize the dataset to make the data meaningful, actionable and readily accessible to all users. 

Start with why

Lean is good but can be limiting without design thinking. There isn’t much difference between Just In Time inventory and Kanban. Yet when one fails, we try the other without giving enough thought to why.

Just in time inventory in healthcare has never worked all that well because it’s too complex for the endusers to maintain. Implementing Kanban with a client made me realize that the system wasn’t going to work much better if at all for the same reasons.

The user’s needs were never really considered in how the system was implemented and once the implementation was started there was no iteration to refine it. Sound familiar? 

Just in Time inventory and Kanban are good frameworks but there is no one size fits all solution. Design thinking is about considering all the issues underlying the problem, the stakeholders and the patients served to solve the problem.