Culture

Living your Values

If you’re thinking which values are you referring to – personal or company values? I’m actually referring to both because there should alignment in your personal and professional life.

If you need to google your company values or call human resources, chances are your company’s values have not been operationalized. Only 10% of companies have a short list of memorable values that they’ve associated with behaviors to reinforce their values.

Salesforce has done a good job of honing the values list to four [4] values and associating behaviors with each value. It’s how they are able to walk their talk in everything they do despite being a very large company.

Whittling down the values list from 100+ takes some time and careful thought. Most companies have a list of 10-15 values but within that shortlist there are usually 2-4 that encompass the company’s core beliefs. 

Operationalizing values is a process of linking values to behaviors so that people understand what’s an acceptable behavior as well as what’s not an acceptable behavior. Providing three [3] examples of each type of behavior is usually enough.

Once the values are operationalized, the company culture will develop to support and enforce those values.

If you’re questioning whether or not it’s worth your time, think about how much easier it will be for everyone in your organization to:

1/ Hire the right people 

2/ Manage customer relationships 

3/ Work collaboratively with people throughout the organization

4/ Make good decisions for the company

Defining and operationalizing your values is not something you want to put off until you’re the size of Salesforce. There are a lot of steps in the journey to realize that level of success. That’s why I think of it as one of those “the sooner the better” activities.

“Daring leaders who live into their values are never silent about hard things.” ~ Brené Brown

Our Values

I’ve been working on refining the values for Rush360 too.

Innovation is the heart of what we do. There are 4 steps in our process [Learn, Engage, Design and Transform].

So I started with the steps and thought about the values we need to have in order to do those things well and support the people on our team.

These are the four values that resonated the most with what we do and why:

1/ Courage: It takes a lot of courage to step into a new environment and to get up to speed quickly especially when people see you as a change agent.

2/ Open: It takes an open mindset to be constantly working with new people, new process, new system and in new environments.

3/ Creativity: We get the benefit of having a fresh perspective on the problem but it takes a lot of creative energy to work with all the stakeholders and to design a solution that works for them now and in the future.

4/ Innovation: It takes someone who loves to innovate because the stakes are high and the risk of failure is real. Failure on any scale is disappointing and tough on the ego.

That leads me to balance. I think everything in life – from our bodies to our businesses – needs balance. In Dare to Lead, Brene talks about daring leaders having a strong back and a soft front. It seemed like a good framework to test the balance of our values… it takes a strong back [courage and love for innovation] and a soft front [open and creative mindset].

Words Matter

How you make people feel is more important than what you do. Why?

It’s a lesson from the book Undo It by Dean Ornish, MD on enhancing one of the four key elements of life – Love. However, it is equally important to remember in the workplace.

I met with a colleague this week and he commented on “the waste” in the US healthcare system. His only point of reference was one statistic: healthcare as a % of GDP.

One statistic does not tell the whole story and for me, it struck a nerve. The healthcare system operated as it was designed and unfortunately, limited technology and misaligned incentives didn’t enable it to operate optimally. That’s changing – although slowly.

Innovation in healthcare is hard in part because the culture doesn’t support it. In Dare to Lead, Brené Brown explains the connection between vulnerability and innovation. You can’t have one without the other because failure is inevitable.

How we think about failure and what we say to those who are brave enough to try and fail matters.

Post: Values

Salesforce is one company that truly walks their talk.

Here’s what I inferred about their values and culture from just one day at Dreamforce:

1/ Environment: Be Mindful. All the nomenclature and products used referenced the environment reminding us all to tread lightly and reduce our impact.

2/ Transparency: Build trust. Customers asked for greater pricing transparency so what are they getting….published rates! Transparency is used to build trust within the organization and with customers.

3/ Inclusion: Be Open. The diversity of the people attending, speaking and customer involvement spoke to their commitment to inclusion and the value of sharing of ideas and lessons learned.

4/ Community: Empower. Community leaders are recognized and empowered to help everyone thrive. After all, big initiatives take a village to do well.

BTW – they are doing some pretty amazing things with their technology too that will help us all blaze new trails. We’ll share more about that in future posts.