2019 February

Medicare for All?

Medicare for All vs. Single Payer System

62% of Americans support the idea of “Medicare for All” even though it’s not clear what it would cover, who it would cover or how it would be administered.

So what are people finding so appealing about it? The number of people supporting a single payer system is lower. Reportedly, only 48% of Americans want a single payer system even though the two are similar in concept.

Is that people understand Medicare coverage because they have had some experience with it or in their minds is there a fundamental difference?

Single payer systems are often plagued with access issues because all the resources are being consumed by older and sicker beneficiaries. However, if something is urgent and life threatening, it gets taken care of quickly. In short, it’s reactive care. That’s probably the scary part of a single payer system for most.

However, what few realize is that many of the single payer systems around the world have a commercial layer that provides access to complimentary care providers who help keep people healthy. Interestingly, the plans are often provided by employers and include luxury benefits like massage therapy.

Single payer vs. Medicare for All: What’s the difference to you?

Health + Healthcare

Is health a personal choice or is there a role for physicians?

A friend recently said to me that the best thing a General Practitioner [GP] could do is write a referral to a specialist. He’s not in healthcare so I had to ask whether he thought GPs should help keep people healthy. He said no. Health is a personal choice.

Are GPs limited in what they can/should do for us by our limited expectations of them? Has the healthcare system trained people to have limited expectations? Or are GPs truly limited in their scope of work?

This conversation relates to another recent conversation with a dialysis nurse as well as our post on complimentary care providers. The dialysis nurse uses a GP that works as a complimentary care provider similar to a naturopathic doctor that helps assess among other things hormones and vitamin deficiencies that affect sleep, weight, mood etc.

The work of a complimentary care providers extend our ability to live healthy lives but few people know about them or know what they can do. Why?

The problem is that complimentary care providers are typically not integrated into the healthcare system and coverage is limited.

Apparently when they are integrated, GPs get the benefit of seeing what’s done and why. They get the full scope of the patient’s care. Patients get comprehensive care that helps them live healthier.