2018 February

Automation + Motivation

Learn what you should be doing now as automation changes the way people work and get rewarded.

Last week I read about a recent Bain & Company report estimating the automation of 40 million jobs [25-30% of US jobs] within the next decade. White color jobs are not immune from outsourcing or automation.

That’s eye opening but technology has made the world feel a lot smaller since the dot-com boom. When I first started my online training business in 2000, a healthcare CEO asked me where my colleagues were located. Everyone was scattered around the US. It seemed to make him feel uncomfortable, but even then high speed internet access enabled my development team to communicate and collaborate in real time.

The tools are better now but technology is also getting smarter. In 2009, I closed my online training business for two reasons:

1/ Much of the revenue cycle work and financial reporting in healthcare could be automated.

2/ The companies that needed a training program were more focused on extrinsic rewards.

Algorithmic Work:
Revenue Cycle work for the most part is algorithmic work or in other words, work that requires routine processing. At least 90% of revenue related transactions can be automated now if companies have invested in their systems. Old patient accounting systems that relied heavily on data entry as a source of information are now the problem because much of the information contained in them is dated and incorrect. There are better ways to obtain, use and store the patient data needed for transacting business.

Heuristic Work:
Automating revenue cycle transactions also changes the skillsets needed to manage the systems and do the remaining 10%. The work becomes less about routine processing and more about creative and analytical problem solving also referred to as heuristic work. Given the nature of the work, heuristic work typically cannot be outsourced or automated.

Motivation:
Many healthcare companies still rely on incentive based reward structures to motivate people to work. Productivity goals made sense when much of the work involved routine processing. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work the same way for people intrinsically motivated by the work itself. In fact, “if then” rewards are often counter productive because it turns something that people enjoy doing into the drudgery of work. Worse yet, decreases in intrinsic motivation can lead to destructive behaviors.

Goals may cause systematic problems for organizations due to narrowed focus, unethical behavior, increased risk taking, decreased cooperation and decreased intrinsic motivation. ~Drive by Daniel Pink

 

Referring back to #2 of my reasons, companies led by people who are driven by immediate extrinsic rewards underperform over the long term simply because they underinvest in training, systems, research and development. Same is true for publicly traded companies who provide the most earnings guidance to Wall Street analysts.

Drive
Drive by Daniel Pink is a book about Motivation that does a good job of connecting the dots of several leaders in modern behavioral research.

Extrinsic rewards are addictive particularly for type A personalities but at a certain point, they don’t make people happier. In fact, people driven by extrinsic rewards are more likely to feel anxious and depressed than intrinsically motivated people.

Three Ingredients of Motivation:

1/ Autonomy: According to Tony Hsieh, founder and CEO of Zappos and author of Delivering Happiness, perceived control is an important component of one’s happiness. When performance goals are tied to compensation it become more about the money and less about the work. Plus when performance metrics are varied they are harder to finagle.

2/ Mastery: Tony Robins recently posted on LinkedIn “All my past failure and frustration were actually laying the foundation for the understandings that have created the new level of living I now enjoy.” That’s mastery. It’s a lifelong period of effort to improve performance in a specific domain. According to Carol Dweck author of Mindset, the effort that it takes to master something meaningful [aka: pain] is what gives meaning to life.

3/ Purpose: The most deeply motivated people – not to mention those who are most productive and satisfied – hitch their desires to a cause larger than themselves.” There are some good examples in Drive of companies leading with purpose. One of which is Toms shoes and another good example not in the book is Patagonia.

For me, our online training program was about giving our students a career path to better job opportunities and a brighter future. That’s why I remained so passionate about it for so long.

So what do you need to do now:

1/ Figure out what type of work motivates you.

2/ Invest in your skillset rather than relying on your employer for training.

3/ Deliberately practice so that you improve.

4/ Identify your Why or in other words, your purpose.

About the Author: Shannon Smith is a healthcare strategist with over fifteen years of experience helping companies achieve greater success. She is also the founder and CEO of Hello Workout.

 

Learn the three Ds

Use the three Ds from the process of “Get Stuff Done” to make good decisions and be more successful at work and in life.

The three Ds are Discussion, Debate and Decision from the process of “Get Stuff Done” described in Radical Candor. I happen to be reading the book this week and used the three Ds as a framework for explaining my process for flushing out the problems, generating ideas and developing the right course of action from a project.

My application of the framework isn’t an exact textbook example. However, it has served as a good way to frame the complexity of the project and balance the complexity with the drive to get the project done.

Discussion:

According to the book, discussion is supposed to take place in 1:1 meetings. Meetings between managers and direct reports are supposed to provide a safe and constructive environment for discussing new ideas, challenges and other issues.

The discussion phase for me happens with a small group of subject matter expertise. It’s a low key discussion to flush out the details of the problem and constraints so that we can generate new ideas for how best to address the need. We basically spend the time thinking about what’s possible. Afterwards I send out a recap of our discussion and capture any additional thoughts on the matter. The recap ensures that we all left the discussion with the same understanding.

Debate:

Debates are bigger meetings to present the ideas so that others can raise their questions and concerns before a decision is reached. Keeping people in debate rather than decision mode is tricky when you have debaters and deciders in the room. Debate can be almost painful for those who already know what they want and/or want a quick decision. If you have ever felt like you got shut down too early during a debate meeting it’s a clear indication that you have debaters and deciders in the room.

The best thing you can do based on my own experience is to communicate your expectation for the meeting and what you want to get from it. If the ideas aren’t flowing, directly challenge the group on a specific problem or idea to spur further debate. The book has some techniques for making sure everyone is in the mind space for a debate meeting and for making it a fun process.

Decide:

People who have a strong grasp of the facts need to make the decisions. Those people are usually closest to the work. That’s why leading edge companies have a process for decision making and why many use the process for Getting Things Done. All of the meetings to discuss, clarify and debate the issues facilitate the decision making process.

The three Ds also help me respect the boundaries of my role as a consultant which is to help flush out the problem, generate ideas and facilitate the decision making process – and not make decisions no matter how tempting.

Application in life

You could apply the three Ds to other relationships as well. Think about the 1:1 meeting framework. When friends and family have problems, they often just want to someone to listen and to ask questions that help them clarify their issues and ideas. They don’t want to be told what to do and definitely don’t want to be judged.

Debate is necessary when decisions affect others. It gives everyone an opportunity to ask questions and raise their concerns so that they can be addressed before a decision is made. Debate often ends too early in the process and unfortunately, the relationships suffer. So keep the debate going until you can make a good decision.

About the Author: Shannon Smith is a healthcare strategist with over fifteen years of experience helping companies achieve greater success. She is also the founder and CEO of Hello Workout.